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Sermon: The woman who touched Jesus’ Garment


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Sermon: The woman who touched Jesus’ Garment Mark 2:25-34

Image courtesy: Visual Bible Alive

Text: Mark 5:25-34

Introduction

Surely every person desires to possess inner peace and security. There are many factors in life which may rob us of such peace. One of these is sickness. It is difficult to maintain inner peace when one is plagued by serious illness. The mind is filled with uncertainty and despair.

Here is a story of just such a person. She has been sick for twelve years. Though she had visited many doctors, none had been able to help her. In fact she even became worse.

Then one glorious day, she met Jesus Christ. Through this wonderful encounter, she was instantly healed of her long-standing sickness. She was also blessed with a deep sense of inner peace.

This same Jesus can also bless your life today. Let us look into this story and discover how she received her healing and how you too can be healed!

1. This woman had no peace

A. She had been constantly ill for 12 years, (Mark 5:25)

B. She had spent all her money. Now she was penniless! (Mark 5:26)

C. She was disappointed and frustrated.

D. She was tempted to despair. It seemed that none could help her. How typical she is of so many today who are lonely, frustrated and insecure.

2. How she came to Christ?

A. She heard what He had done for someone else, (Mark 5:27)

B. She determined that she too would seek His healing.

C. She encouraged herself in faith. She said within her self “if I can but touch the border of His garment I shall be healed”, (Mark 5:28)

D. She overcame any obstacles.

E. She came to Christ.

F. She touched Him by faith.

G. His life flowed in to her. Immediately she was made whole, (Mark 5:29)

3. Her salvation

A. The disciples could not help her. They did not even know her need. There are times when no human being can help us. Only God is able to meet our deepest needs.

B. Christ required her confession! Who touched me? (Mark 5:30) He already knew who had touched Him, but He wanted her public confession, (Romans 10:10) “With the heart man believeth unto righteousness. And with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.”

C. Christ called her “Daughter”. He accepted her as a member of God’s family, (Mark 5:34)

D. He told her to “Go in peace” (Mark 5:34b). From that moment she knew real peace. Uncertainty and anxiety were banished, and the peace of God filled her heart and mind.

E. It was her faith which made her whole. God desires everyone to be whole. Perfectly sound in spirit, soul and body.

4. Conclusion

She went away a transformed person. You too can be transformed if you come to Christ in faith.

Taken from Ministry Principals & Church Planting - Module 2

by

Gerald Rowlands

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4 Responses to “Sermon: The woman who touched Jesus’ Garment”

  1. Brenda Patterson says:

    Thank you for your sermon: The woman who touched Jesus’ Garment Mark 2:25-34

    You made very good points.

    One sentence says, "His life flawed in to her." I think you meant, "…flowed into her."

    What a joy it is to read about God's word online where the whole world can read it also!

    Thank you for your part.

    In Jesus' Love,

    Brenda

  2. What God has showed me by the words of truth is that many words in the Bible may be interpreted, at times, metaphorically as well as literally. This is one of the instances where I would assert such, because I feel the Spirit saying, "Hey, it's not so simple!"

    She touched Jesus' garment. Jesus was the only human being to ever be fully without sin, so touching His conscience would have a big impact on someone. Garments signify the conscience, which is why Adam and Eve made coverings of fig leaves when they found out their shame in being naked. There is no inherent shame in being naked, but if you think of a spiritual covering, like a conscience, which gets dirty depending on what touches it—then you will see what I mean.

    Also, think of the parable or allegory of the father of the bridegroom who casts out those guests from the dinner who showed up with filthy garments (not wedding attire). Why would he call for everyone to be brought in if some were bound to be poor and dirty? Well, this isn't condemning the poor, but those who are guilty of sin and haven't washed themselves in Jesus blood, which is like a garment He wears, which we can touch when we are in need of healing/forgiveness. Many times when people heal people in the Bible, they say "I forgive you." Why would this be if there weren't a spiritual connection between illness and sin? Perhaps there is more than just a metaphorical connection, but it is at least metaphorical. Also, think about Jesus feeling that virtue left Him when the gal touched the corner of His garment. How could this be, if not that she was accessing His conscience or cleansing power of the Holy Ghost, which we all have access to through His blood?

    I hope this helps. Metaphors and allegories can be overdone in many ridiculous ways in regards to the Bible, but I believe that the garment metaphor and even others, like food, places, etc., are able to lead to Christ by such understanding. Of course, it only comes from the Holy Ghost, so it is important to pray very much and read the Bible as much as needed in order to see the patterns. In Jesus' name, God bless!

    • Yohan Perera says:

      What ever needs to interpreted must be interpreted metaphorically while others must be interpreted literally. Taking something simple and attempting to give it some sophisticated metaphorical interpretation without paying careful attention to its context can cause a theological, doctrinal, hermeneutical and a homiletical disaster.

      Such is the case in the account the woman who touched Jesus' garment. It's not a parable. It's a real incident the writer presents here. The simple truth is the woman touched Jesus' garment indeed. In this context it's totally unnecessary to interpret the term 'garment'. I strongly agree with you on your comment about the parable of the great banquet, (Matthew 22:11-14) however.